Maple and Mustard Glazed Easter Ham

A succulent glazed ham is an easy and classic choice for a holiday celebration. And since Easter is right around the corner, why not plan on picking up a half pre-cooked ham, either shank or butt end if you will be serving 12 or fewer people.  For a larger number of people, a whole ham would be your best choice. Providing you’re not going for a smoked country ham, a ready-to-eat ham is an economical choice as it often goes on sale just before Easter.  Even so, look for the best quality. “In natural juices” on the label will assure a better flavor than”with water added”.

Now, which to buy, the butt end or the shank end?  The butt end will provide more meat, although it will be more difficult to slice because of the shape of the bone.

And to accompany your savory entree, how about a batch of Chef David Leite’s airy pull-apart rolls?

Ingredients

½ ready-to-eat, cooked ham, bone-in, uncut (not spiral cut), shank or butt end, 8-11 lbs.

About 50 cloves

Glaze

½ cup champagne vinegar

¾ cup maple syrup

½ cup country-style Dijon mustard

2 T apricot jam

Pinch of kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Remove the ham from the refrigerator still in its wrapping a couple of hours before you’re planning to cook so as to bring it close to room temperature.

2. Make a diamond pattern on the ham by cutting straight lines into the fat with a sharp knife about ½ inch deep parallel to each other.  Score another set of lines at a 45 degree angle to the first to create a diamond pattern. The classic appearance is achieved by inserting a clove at each intersection.

3. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.  Place ham, fat side up in a roasting pan lined with aluminum foil.  Cook ham in oven for one hour.

4. While ham is cooking, make glaze.  In a small saucepan, heat vinegar over medium heat until reduced to 2 T.

5. Add maple syrup, mustard, jam and salt.  Cook, whisking, until well combined, about 2 minutes.  Season with pepper to taste and set aside.

6. Remove ham from oven and brush top and sides generously with one third of the glaze.

7. Return to oven.  Remember that the ham is already cooked so you don’t have to cook to an internal temperature of 140 degrees as is often instructed.  The ham will need about another half hour of cooking to achieve an inner temperature between 110 and 120 degrees.  It will be very warm, if not hot, and is more likely to retain its moisture.

8. Baste every ten minutes with the glaze. Don’t baste ham with its own juices as the glaze might wash off.

9. Take the ham out of the oven, cover with aluminum foil and let rest 15 minutes before serving.

Photographer Bill Brady

Smoked Ham and White Bean Soup

Does it seem that that big chunk of leftover Easter ham might remain in your refrigerator for weeks, even if you have a large family?  Fear not.  Here is an idea of how to turn that succulent, savory meat and ham bone into an invigorating soup.

Ingredients

3 T olive oil

2 cups small diced onions

1 cup small diced celery

1 cup small diced carrots

3 cloves garlic, finely minced

16 oz. can diced tomatoes

1 Mediterranean bay leaf

1 T fresh thyme, minced or 1 t dried

½ t freshly ground black pepper

2-3 lbs. ham shanks or hocks

6 cups chicken stock (water can be substituted or added if more is needed)

1/4 cup dried lentils

1 large potato, diced

3 cans white beans, such as cannellini, drained

1 t hot sauce, such as sriracha, or to taste

Leftover ham, diced

Procedure

In a large Dutch oven or stock pot over medium heat, add oil. When oil is hot, add onions, celery and carrots.  Sauté until onions are translucent, about 4 minutes.  Add garlic, tomatoes, bay leaf, thyme and pepper.  Cook a few more minutes until spices begin to release their flavors.

Add 2-3 lbs. of ham shanks or hocks and stock.  Bring to a boil, reduce to medium low and simmer for 45 minutes.  Add more stock or water if needed.  Add lentils and potato and cook for 20 minutes..  Remove shanks or hocks and bay leaf.  Add beans and sriracha sauce.  Stir.

To thicken soup, pulse very briefly with a stick blender or take out 2 cups, puree in a food processor and add back to pot.  Remove the meat from the bones and return to pot along with any other leftover ham.  Heat through, taste for seasoning* and ladle into individual serving bowls.  Serve with a crusty bread.  Serves 8-10.

*Not knowing how salty your ham might be, I have omitted salt.  Add to taste if needed.

(photo by Bill Brady)

Easter Dessert: A Tart to Dazzle

What better way to usher in Spring than with a luscious and colorful fresh fruit tart?  This recipe will fill a 9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom. (8 servings)

Ingredients

Dough for pastry crust:

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

2 T superfine sugar

1 t salt

4 T butter

4 T Crisco

1 egg yolk

ice water

Procedure:

1. Place flour, sugar and salt in the bowl of a food processor with metal blade in place.  Pulse just until mixed.

2. Add butter and Crisco in 1-tablespoon pieces and egg yolk.  Process until only pea size pieces of fat remain.

3. Distribute 3 tablespoons ice water over mixture and process just until mixture holds together when pinched between fingers.  Add a little more water if necessary.  Don’t let a ball form.

4. Place dough on a lightly floured surface.  Press heel of hand into dough and smear outward several times (frissage). This will incorporate fat and make dough less likely to break when rolled out.  Form into a disk, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for a half hour.

5. Roll out tart crust to a 12-14 inch round and fit into a 9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom.

6. Gently fit dough into edge of pan without stretching.  Cut overhang with kitchen shears outside the rim to give the sides a little extra dough.  Chill in refrigerator or freezer for a half hour.

Blind Baking the Shell

7. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  Line pastry crust with a large coffee filter paper or parchment paper.

8.  Fill to ½inch with pie weights or dried beans.  Bake in lower third of oven for 15 minutes.

9. Take out pie weights and filter paper.  Prick bottom of shell in several places to prevent it from puffing up.

10. Place back in oven for 12 to 15 minutes more until fully baked and lightly browned.  Cool in tart pan on a rack.

strawberry rhubarb pie

Pastry Cream

Ingredients

½ cup milk

4 t flour

2 T sugar

Pinch salt

2 t powdered gelatin

1 egg

½ t vanilla extract

½ cup heavy cream, whipped

Procedure

11. Heat milk in a small saucepan. Place flour, sugar, salt and gelatin in a heavy saucepan and stir together.

12. Mix in the egg with a wooden spoon until a smooth paste is formed.  Slowly whisk in the hot milk.  Place the saucepan over medium heat, whisking until mixture becomes a thick custard.

13. To aid cooling, place mixture in a small bowl and allow to cool to room temperature.  Stir in vanilla. Fold in the whipped cream   Spread custard over pre-baked pastry shell.

orange tart

Arranging the Fruit Topping

14. Now you can get those creative juices flowing and decorate your tart with the fruit of your choice. Choose what you love and what’s fresh in the market. Plums sliced into wedges, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, ripe mango cut into uniform shapes.  The list goes on.

15. Start at the outside rim and work your way toward the center, overlapping where necessary and voila!  . .  a beautiful fresh fruit tart.  Leave as is or glaze as follows:

16. Melt 4 oz. apricot preserves in a small saucepan.  Strain through a sieve.  Loosen with a little water or liqueur, if necessary.  With a small brush, apply to fruit.  It will win you kudos either way.

Fresh Fruited Holidays

fresh fruit kebobs with celery seed dressing

By Victor Ribaudo

just picked strawberries

I love the Spring Holiday season.  Whether I’m seated a friend’s Seder dinner for Passover, or my family’s Easter celebration, there’s a sense of renewal and rebirth that only this time of year can offer.  Gastronomically speaking, that inevitably spells fresh fruit to me.

When invited to Passover dinners, I’m very conscious of what’s Kosher and what’s not. So to play it safe I bring a nice Kosher wine as well as a fresh fruit tray.  Everyone loves the freshness of fruit at the end of the meal, before coffee and desserts are served.  As for the Easter menu at my Mom’s home, we also include fruit in the offing.  Fruit is fresh and colorful…very much like Easter itself.  And we find interesting ways to incorporate it into our recipes.

As I mentioned in our last blog, ham is very often featured as the centerpiece of the Easter spread.  And nothing complements it better than fruit.  My Mom does a great pineapple in butter rum sauce, studded with plump raisins.  She discovered it at a diner, of all places.  They wouldn’t offer her the recipe, so she deconstructed it on her own and came up with something spectacular.  It’s basically a Bananas Foster, except with pineapple.  Really nice ladled over slices of smoky ham.

flaming pineapple

I, on the other hand, take pineapple rings and grill them on the backyard barbecue.  Simple, really.  Just coat the fresh rings with sugar and grill until there’s a nice caramelization happening.  It’s usually the first “grill” of the season, which excites me because it sort of ushers in warm weather celebrations for us all.  A delectable counterfoil to the saltiness of the ham.

apple pie

Pineapple is just the beginning of our fruit forays for the Holiday.  Instead of mint jelly for my lamb, I opt for beautiful compote of fresh fruits.  While some fruits are not really in their season, there are still plenty of choices out there.  Mango, for instance.  You may also want to investigate a dried fruit compote recipe, which is actually a Passover favorite for many families.  I really like what fruit does for lamb.  And for those mint and lamb lovers, you may include a few sprigs as you prepare your compote.

skewered fruit

Of course, your holiday salad can incorporate any number of fresh fruits.  I like the taste of fresh strawberries or raspberries and feta cheese in my salad.  I dress it with olive oil and lemon juice.  Greek inspired, I find this salad complements my lamb in a gyro sort of way.  Orange slices, accompanied by toasted almond slivers, is another salad favorite of mine.  I usually go Asian and dress this one with sesame oil and rice vinegar.  Of course, fresh green grapes in your salad are always a welcome sight.  An interesting tartness balances out the other ingredients well.  Really, there’s no end to the fruit and salad possibilities.

Now on to the holiday finale.  In true Italian fashion, we serve fresh fruit before coffee and pastries and the like.  We will often offer appropriate cheeses and nuts as well.  When desserts do arrive, there is the Pizza di Grano, of course (an Italian cheesecake with wheat berries).  However, there are often fruit pies to be found as well.  Blueberry, strawberry and cherry are my preferred choices.  I must admit, though, that fresh fruit tarts are really what I long for this time of year.  Depending on what looks good at your fruit stand, you can let your culinary imagination run rampant here.  Be creative, make lovely designs and have a ball.  We asked Phyllis for her favorite recipe.  Try it.  It’s fabulous.

cheese plate

Fruit makes it lively.  That’s my motto.  Just what we all need this time of year, as hints of milder, longer days and happy celebrations are all around us.  After a long winter, we’ve all earned it.  Enjoy!

Photographer Bill Brady

(Strawberry rhubarb pie by sweetpaprika)

Written by Victor Ribaudo

Blog syndicated at the datingsymbol.com

Blueberry Lattice Pie

Blueberry Pie, Food & Wine Section Dating Symbol blogNeed a luscious Easter dessert?  Something both sweet and tart with a light buttery undertone?  Think blueberries.  Available year round and often sporting a more than reasonable price.  And if that weren’t enough, blueberries have been found to be a “superfood”, so good for you that you should go out of you way to eat them.

And what could possibly be better than eating them out of hand?  How about a mouth-watering blueberry pie?  You may be picturing a pie with the juices running amuck or worse, a gluey texture.  Not to worry.   I think you’ll find this recipe to have the perfect texture with a combination of jammy and whole berries.  Enjoy!

Dough

2 ½ cups all-purpose flour

1 t salt

2 T sugar

12 oz. unsalted cold butter cut into 1 T slices

4 T Crisco

¼ to ½ cup ice water

Pulse flour, salt and sugar in food processor until mixed.  Scatter butter over flour mixture and pulse briefly. Add Crisco and pulse again.  You should still see tiny bits of butter.  Pour ¼ cup ice water around bowl of processor. Pulse until dough holds together between thumb and forefinger.  Add more gradually, one tablespoon at a time, if necessary.    This is a key step. Dough should not look dry nor should it look wet.   Don’t let ball form.  Place dough on work surface, pat together and press outward with heel of hand to incorporate butter into flour.   Gather into a ball and divide in half.  Form into disks.  Wrap each in plastic wrap and refrigerate for about an hour.

Line a large cookie sheet with aluminum foil to catch any filling that may bubble over.  Heat in a 400 degree oven while you’re making the filling.

Filling

4 pints fresh blueberries

1 cup sugar

1 t lemon zest

1 t fresh lemon juice

½ t ground cinnamon

¼ t freshly ground nutmeg

4 T tapioca flour (or cornstarch)

2 T unsalted butter cut into small cubes

Egg wash made with one egg beaten with a pinch of salt

1 t coarse sugar for finishing top of pie (optional)

Directions

Rinse and pick over blueberries.  Set aside 2 cups. Place remainder in a non-reactive saucepan along with sugar.  Cook over medium heat until the sugar melts and mixture is bubbling.  Stir and don’t allow mixture to stick to bottom of pan.  Add lemon zest, lemon juice, ground cinnamon, nutmeg and tapioca flour.  Continue stirring until mixture has thickened and is lightly bubbling.  Set aside to cool.

Roll out one disk of dough to fit into deep dish pie pan.  Trim overhang and place in freezer while you roll out the second disk of dough for the top.  Using a pastry cutter, cut strips of dough 1 inch wide.  Fold the 2 cups of whole berries and butter into blueberry mixture and fill bottom crust mounding in center.

Lightly moisten top edge of bottom crust with water.  Arrange strips of dough across top spacing about ¾ of an inch apart.  Then add strips at an angle across the first set.  Press onto bottom crust and trim overhang.  Brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sugar.  Place in oven on preheated baking sheet.  Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes and then lower to 350 for 25 to 35 more or until crust is golden brown and filling is bubbling.

Cool on a rack.  Serve with a big scoop of vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.  Serves 8.

Photographer Bill Brady http://bit.ly/9wFYxm

Food Stylist Brian Preston Campbell  http://www.preston-campbell.com

Easter Ham with Maple and Mustard Glaze

Plated ham with potatoes and spring vegetables

A succulent glazed ham is an easy and classic choice for a holiday celebration. And since Easter is right around the corner, why not plan on picking up a half pre-cooked ham, either shank or butt end if you will be serving 12 or fewer people.  For a larger number of people, a whole ham would be your best choice. Providing you’re not going for a smoked country ham, a ready-to-eat ham is an economical choice as it often goes on sale just before Easter.  Even so, look for the best quality. “In natural juices” on the label will assure a better flavor than”with water added”.

Now, which to buy, the butt end or the shank end?  The butt end will provide more meat, although it will be more difficult to slice because of the shape of the bone.

Ingredients

½ ready-to-eat, cooked ham, bone-in, uncut (not spiral cut), shank or butt end, 8-11 lbs.

About 50 cloves

Glaze

½ cup champagne vinegar

¾ cup maple syrup

½ cup country-style Dijon mustard

2 T apricot jam

Pinch of kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Remove the ham from the refrigerator still in its wrapping a couple of hours before you’re planning to cook so as to bring it close to room temperature.

2. Make a diamond pattern on the ham by cutting straight lines into the fat with a sharp knife about ½ inch deep parallel to each other.  Score another set of lines at a 45 degree angle to the first to create a diamond pattern. The classic appearance is achieved by inserting a clove at each intersection.

3. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.  Place ham, fat side up in a roasting pan lined with aluminum foil.  Cook ham in oven for one hour.

4. While ham is cooking, make glaze.  In a small saucepan, heat vinegar over medium heat until reduced to 2 T.

5. Add maple syrup, mustard, jam and salt.  Cook, whisking, until well combined, about 2 minutes.  Season with pepper to taste and set aside.

6. Remove ham from oven and brush top and sides generously with one third of the glaze.

7. Return to oven.  Remember that the ham is already cooked so you don’t have to cook to an internal temperature of 140 degrees as is often instructed.  The ham will need about another half hour of cooking to achieve an inner temperature between 110 and 120 degrees.  It will be very warm, if not hot, and is more likely to retain its moisture.

8. Baste every ten minutes with the glaze. Don’t baste ham with its own juices as the glaze might wash off.

9. Take the ham out of the oven, cover with aluminum foil and let rest 15 minutes before serving.

Spiral ham

Everyone’s a Ham by Victor Ribaudo

With Easter fast approaching, many of us are planning the big spread.  A couple of blogs back I spoke about my love affair with lamb.  That’s always been the holiday staple in my home this time of year.  I’d be remiss, however, if I didn’t extol the virtues of the ever popular ham.  It also makes an appearance on so many an Easter dining table.

In fact, it almost always seems to be present at any festive holiday meal in America.  Probably because it’s easy to prepare and it just tastes so good!

When I discuss ham with people my age (over 30 is all I’m admitting to) almost everyone has a similar early experience.  Many of us were served the ones that come from those oversized tin cans.  Opening them was a perilous job which my Mom would only entrust to my Dad.  I believe we called them Polish hams in our home.  I don’t know that it really made sense to do so.  I do know that they were usually donned with pineapple rings and maraschino cherries before being popped in the oven to warm through.  They were tasty, especially in the following day’s lunch boxes – nestled between two slices of bread with copious amounts of mustard, of course.

Spiral ham platter

The canned variety doesn’t find its way to my table anymore.  I, as most of my fellow foodies, have graduated to more lofty ham aspirations.  There are all sorts of varieties from which to choose – boneless, bone-in…smoked, sugar-cured…whole, butt, shank, spiral.  You name it, it’s out there and pre-cooked or cured for your convenience.

My personal favorites are the smoky varieties. (Smithfield, yum!) Bone- in, of course.  I mean, who doesn’t look forward to pea soup simmered with a ham bone?  The bone is a must for this home chef.

Lentil and Bean Soup

What’s interesting to me is that although in its purest form ham is just a cured roast, there are so many delectable ways to enhance it.  I like my ham studded with cloves.  Call me a purist, but it just works.  And I prefer it glazed with a sweet concoction.  A nice counterpart to the saltiness of the meat.  (Try Phyllis’ recipe above.  It’s a winner.)

I don’t stop there, though.  Fruit and ham go together like love and marriage.  (Come on, you know it’s true!)  And although pineapple and ham make a heavenly pair, I will often complement mine with peaches sautéed in butter and kissed with a bit of rum.  Over the top for you?  Well, any fruit compote will do, really.  I would stay away from pears and apples for Easter, though.  Too autumnal.

Baguette with ham and brie

Now, I must admit that my favorite uses for ham fall in the leftovers department.  I adore it fried up with eggs the following morning.  Divine.  Sliced and pressed in a panini with brie for lunch.  Irresistible.  Cubed in dinner time soups, stews and salads.  Doesn’t get any better.  Yes, I can eat ham all day long.  My mouth may be dry at midnight, but I’m fully sated.

You know, I’ve just decided to serve ham along with the leg of lamb at my Easter celebration.  I’m hoping that all of the lamb goes, and there’s plenty of ham left over.  It’ll be a salty Monday…and I’m going to enjoy every bit of it.

Recipe by Phyllis Kirigin

Photographer Bill Brady

Written by Victor Ribaudo

Blog syndicated at the datingsymbol.com

Abigail-Madison Chase says:

April 13, 2011 at 6:49 pm

This looks delicious I am trying it for Easter!

Braised Lamb Shanks with Gremolata

braised lamb shank

Soul-satisfying comfort food at its best, braised lamb shanks will fill every room in your house with an amazing aroma.  The fresh gremolata garnish cuts the richness of this hearty but not heavy dish. (4 servings)

Ingredients

Extra virgin olive oil

4 lamb shanks about 1 ¼ lbs. each

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

3 carrots, peeled and cut into ½-inch dice

2 yellow onions cut into a 1-inch dice

3 celery ribs, cut into a1/2-inch dice

4 cloves garlic

1 12-oz. can tomato paste

2 cups full-bodied red wine

2 T finely chopped rosemary leaves

10-12 thyme branches with leaves tied together

3 to 4 cups water

3 Turkish bay leaves

Gremolata (recipe follows)

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

2. Place 3 T olive oil in a large Dutch oven.  Heat to almost smoking.

3. Season shanks generously with salt and pepper.  Brown well on all sides.

4. Finely chop the carrots, onions, celery and garlic in a food processor until they become a coarse paste.  Remove and set aside.

5. Remove shanks from the pan to a rimmed baking sheet.  Discard excess fat from pan.

6. Add a little more oil to pan and add the vegetable paste.  Sauté until it is very brown and fragrant, about 20 minutes, but do not let burn.  Take your time with this step since this is where the brown color and flavor is developed.

7. Add tomato paste and brown for another 5 minutes.  Stir in the wine, chopped rosemary and bundle of thyme.  Stir frequently and cook until the wine has reduced by half.

8. Add the shanks back to the pan and pour in 3 to 4 cups of water.  If the shanks are not submerged, add a little more water.

9. Add the bay leaves, cover and place in the preheated oven.  The cooking time will be 2 ½ to 3 hours.  Turn the shanks about halfway through the cooking time.  Check every 45 minutes or so to see if the liquid has reduced too much and add more water if needed.  Skim fat off surface as you go.

10. When the shanks are done, the meat should be falling-off -the bone tender and richly flavorful.  Remove and keep warm.  The sauce can be boiled down to thicken.  Transfer to serving plates and top with braising sauce and gremolata.  Serve with barley risotto, polenta cakes or mashed potatoes, if desired.

Gremolata

Zest of 1 lemon

Zest of 1 orange

¼ cup finely minced parsley leaves

1 garlic clove, minced

2 T freshly grated horseradish

Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and set aside until ready to use.

(Adapted from recipe by Anne Burrell)

roast leg of lamb

Taking It on the Lamb

by Victor Ribaudo

Some say lamb is an acquired taste.  For me, it’s a necessity. There’s something so robust and earthy about the flavor and aroma – a quality that makes it a truly satisfying meal for me.  And although I partake of it all year long, there’s really no more perfect time to enjoy the best of spring lamb than right now.

When I was just a lad, I would give a big cheer when lamb was on the menu.  My grandmother, as most Italian women, included it in her Sunday dinner repertoire.  Grandma would insert deep knife cuts all over the meaty portions of the leg, and stuff the holes with garlic, flat leaf parsley and sometimes chunks of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese.  After anointing the lamb with extra virgin olive oil and a generous seasoning of salt and ground black pepper, she would roast it in the oven.  My goodness, that was just perfect.  If I recall correctly, she also surrounded the roast with potatoes and onions, which absorbed the juices and were just heaven.

rib lamb chops

That was my father’s mother, Santina.  My mother’s mother, Caterina, was a big proponent of lamb as well.  She always prepared dinner for us on Wednesdays.  You see, my Mom worked and her mother came midweek to help out.  Many of those glorious Wednesday evening meals included lamb chops in vermouth.  Grandma would sear the lamb in hot oil, then sauté onions and garlic in the left over brown bits at the bottom of the pan.  In went lots of vermouth to deglaze and then the chops were returned to pan.  She covered that simmering gorgeousness and braised it until the meat was falling off the bone.  Served with white rice, I just can’t express how wonderful that dish was.  You must try it.

baby lamb chops

Now, I’ve described two very simple recipes that come from my youth.  Lamb, however, is bold enough to stand up against more elaborate preparations.  You’ll discover it in many a Middle Eastern dish, complemented by lots of cinnamon, nutmeg, cumin and coriander.  Indian and African cuisine as well.  What I love about lamb in these gastronomic traditions is that you never lose the flavor of the meat.   With all the spicy rubs and even curry sauces, you still taste lamb.  Can’t say that about chicken.  Even beef.  No, lamb was made for these heady stew, kebab and meatball recipes.

braised lamb shank

Lamb makes for sort of a regal feast as well.  Take the baby lamb chop.  You’ll find it simply grilled or broiled at many a swanky cocktail party.  A perfectly gentile finger food, I must say.  Of course, there’s also the royal crown roast of lamb – ends frenched please!  When I’m cooking to impress, I make it the centerpiece of the meal.  I stuff the cavity with a mint scented rice pilaf.  I don’t particularly care for mint jelly, though.  Reminds me of chewing gum.  But, hey, I place it on the table anyway.  So many of my guests would be disappointed if I didn’t.

crown roast of lamb

By the way, have you ever tried a lamb hamburger?  Or perhaps a lamb meatloaf?  Not as lofty as some of the above mentioned, but still good eats.  This Italian even includes lamb chops with the meatballs and pork ribs in his meat sauce.  Gives Sunday pasta extra depth, my aunt always said.

With Easter fast approaching for so many of us, think about serving a leg of lamb roasted with rosemary and garlic.  Or Phyllis’ braised lamb shank (recipe above).  Place it next to the baked ham, and see which goes faster.  I’m taking bets on the lamb.

Recipe by Phyllis Kirigin

Photographer Bill Brady

Written by Victor Ribaudo


Food Stylist BrianPreston Campbell

Blog syndicated at the datingsymbol.com

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